Women In Entertainment 

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Philadelphia has been a vital music city for decades. The contribution has been as diverse as Doo Whop, the Soul sound of the seventies and the golden era of hip-hop. All of those movements included women. They have not only contributed their talent on stage but applied their organizational skills from public relations, managing, sales and so forth.

CupofSoul had the pleasure of recently speaking to some of the women that are currently making their mark in the industry. We talked to them about what influenced them from entering the business, musical tastes and how the recent revelations of the #metoo movement help exposed the patriarchy and sexism that exist in the industry.

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Jocelyn N

oelle-

Publicist

@JAgencyInc

1.First concert you attended? Dee-Nice, Kwame, and EPMD The Philly Wrap Up Show During Penn Relays

2. What made you want to be in entertainment? Lorraine Ballard Morrill of Power 99 interviewed me when I was about 7-8 at a community event at Bright Hope Baptist Church. When I heard my voice during the Carter and Sanborn morning show you couldn't tell me I wasn't famous. That was the spark.

3. Do you think women receive enough credit for their contributions to music? I don't, it's better than it has been but I think with the various mediums available to us. You have to be able to toot your own horn and make your own lane and sing your own praises.

4. Do you think the #MeToo movement will help improve things for women in music? Not at all. Although many women were compelled to share their stories but ultimately with every "it" thing it faded to black and the conversation died out with the conviction of Cosby. How many women in the urban community are stepping up and telling their truth about being propositioned or given ultimatums. Slim to none this is still a "boys" club that we are allowed to frequent every so often.

5. What needs to be done to improve the communication between older and younger women? People who are respected in the industry having honest dialogue with newbies. Messages fall on deaf ears if you don't have followers in this era.

6. Who is your model for entertainment ? There were many when I was first coming up Danyel Smith (first female editor of Vibe) Shanti Das. Currently I'm loving Jas Fly, Christina Rice, and Syreta J. Ogelsby.

7. Where do see the role of women in entertainment growing? No clue. The world is changing and I'm not one of those people stuck on what it used to be. I like the new wave of creativity, the new perspectives. Where ever it's headed I'm here for it!

 

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Scarlet Hernandez-

Head of the #Freethinkers Program at RECPhilly

@scarletestelle

1.First concert you attended?

Fall Out Boy in 2007

2. What made you want to be in entertainment?

I knew I wanted to be in entertainment because after years of religiously going to concerts, I came the the realization I wanted to be a part of these artists lives and how they connect with the fans. Each concert I went to growing up were happy, memorable experiences and I knew I wanted to be a reason why these shows happen.

Although most of my concert experiences were great, I noticed a distinct lack of women, let alone women of color, working behind the scenes. I knew from then on I wanted to represent myself in the music industry.

3. Do you think women receive enough credit for their contributions to music?

I don't think women receive enough for their contributions in general, let alone music. For example, some of the most well known songs were written by women but sung by men who make this popular. These woman behind the booth and stage are critical to the success of the industry. From managers, performers, public relations, sound engineers and everything in between, women make the music industry tick but simply do not get enough credit for their contributions.

4. Do you think the #MeToo movement will help improve things for women in music?


I think the #MeToo movement will help improve things for women in the music industry as well as outside of music. The #MeToo movement has helped women connect and communicate on a topic rarely spoken about due to fear, regret, or even embarrassment. Social media has given a voice to the marginalized and thus spilled into the real world where women & allies can work together and make real changes.


5. What needs to be done to improve the communication between older and younger women?

Accessibility to mentor-ship is a huge asset to communication between generations. Understanding that not only can the younger woman catch the older women up to speed on new technologies, trends, and issues within the industry, the older woman can give insight, context, and history to why the industry is the way it is right now. There's a lot to learn from both angles if egos are put aside and social media is used the right way to connect.


6. Who is your model for entertainment and why?

I don't particularly have a role model in the entertainment, rather I'm continually inspired by the women of color in the industry I'm surrounded with everyday. It's up to us to pave the way to become role models for the ladies in music of tomorrow. We need to see ourselves as the necessary representation needed in music to thrive and be more inclusive. My role model is anyone who is proud of who they are, where they've come from, and what they're going to do.

7. Where do see the role of women in entertainment growing?

I see the role of women in entertainment growing exponentially and in a short amount of time. With the accessibility of the internet and new college offerings across the nation and world, we will see a boom in ladies taking the reigns in learning about sound engineering, production, management, marketing and so much more that makes this industry tick. This is no longer a boy's game dictated by a certain few gatekeepers, this is industry will be up for grabs to be in regardless of gender.


 

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Stephanie Seiple-McKie/

Regional Promotion Mgr-NE 1608/Reviver Records

@stephanieseiple

1.First concert you attended? James Brown - Atlantic City - I think in 1992?


2. What made you want to be in entertainment? My dad was a drummer in a cover band for 25 yrs. We grew up with band practice at our house since I was 8 yrs old and the stereo was always on. I started playing drums when I was in grade school and I just caught the bug. I was obsesses with records, tapes, and radio growing up, and I still am. TV was never my thing, It has always been about music.


3. Do you think women receive enough credit for their contributions to music? The industry was built by men, and it is still lead my men. Altho there’s been a lot of change over the last 10yrs and especially in the last 3yrs, women still deserve way more credit for sure. But it takes time in a world were males have dominated for so long, and so many ‘behaviors’ were just common place and accepted, until now.


4. Do you think the #MeToo movement will help improve things for women in music? Something needed to be rattled for serious change which is what we’re seeing now with the #MeToo movement. So I’m excited about the future, I just hope that it’s an honest and validating future. I recently heard some negative chatter about women only getting senior level positions right now just because it will look better for a company. That way of thinking is taking 2 steps back. Diversity and inclusion are big issues overall that need to be worked on from the top down. A company's staff should reflect more of what we look like as a country today and those who are music creators all inclusively. So I think the movement has started and I’m hopeful we’ll stay on the path.


5. What needs to be done to improve the communication between older and younger women? One issue I’ve seen is younger women not respecting veterans in the industry. Older women can provide years of priceless experiences and knowledge that you will never find in a classroom or a book. But I’ve also witnessed older women who look at younger women as a threat or simply that they have nothing to offer them. Realistically, not everyone who comes across your path is going to be worth your time. Some young women simply are not cut out for this industry, and they will get flushed out after time. And some older women in this business are just not good teachers or mentors. But I think the key is to just give each other more chances and opportunity to communicate, work together on a project - you just might surprise yourself what you can both gain from working as a team vs treating each other like the enemy.
6. Who is your model for entertainment ? Richard Branson. He started and empire label with Virgin, and was smart enough to not just put all his eggs in one basket. He keeps expended on his successes by creating and investing in other exemplary business ventures, but at the same time donating so much time global to charity and doing that continuously. He also believes in people first when it comes to creating a team. I too believe your team is 100% part of your success. I just hope one day to have enough income to do all the charity work he does! I’m looking forward to reading his new autobiography.

7. Where do you see the role of women in entertainment growing? Everywhere. I think we are going to see a lot more women being hired into management, and leadership roles, as well as greater recognition for women in production, women getting their own imprints under major labels, etc. But again I think we’re just scratching the surface. Men in general, in ALL professions get paid more then women. So it’s not just women in music, but I hope that with things like the #MeToo movement and the power behind it, we start to see women being more respected, taken more seriously, paid equally, and taking on more leading roles in companies globally.



 

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Roxi Fab-

Radio Personality/Singer/Actress

@SheisRoxiFab

1.First concert you attended?

The first concert I attended was Michael Jackson and the Jackson Five in 1975. My father is a friend of the family, and I had the ultimate experience...sitting on Marlon's lap backstage.


2. What made you want to be in entertainment?

I've always wanted to be a singer or a dancer. My father was a Disc Jockey on WDAS, and he is a background vocalist on many records, so I knew that it was what I was supposed to do.


3. Do you think women receive enough credit for their contributions to music?

I do not feel that women receive the credit they deserve for their contributions in this industry. The double standard is real.


4. Do you think the #MeToo movement will help improve things for women in music?

I'm honestly not sure if the #MeToo movement will help improve things for women in music, and film/tv. It's a start though!


5. What needs to be done to improve the communication between older and younger women?

Younger women these days, well most, don't want to listen.....take advice....and take heed to what us older women are more knowledgeable about. They barely take advice from their mothers....It's sad but it's true. We listened (most of the time) to our mothers, and we learned. These girls are just relying on their bodies, not their bars/lyrics


6. Who is your model for entertainment ?

Business wise - it would be Queen Latifah. Music wise - it would be Patti Labelle.


7. Where do see the role of women in entertainment growing?

Women are taking over the airwaves and I believe that we can and will continue to do so, even stronger and better than before! We can't seem to get voice over commercials for these shows out here, but we have to come together and make a stand that we will be heard. We unfortunately have to prove our knowledge about this industry to the world, then we can take it over and do things correctly.





 

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Jasmine Anderson-

Entrepreneur

@SincerelyJsmn

1.First concert you attended?

The very first concert I attended was a Summer concert presented by Power99 back in 2008.


2. What made you want to be in entertainment?

Since a little girl, I've always been involved in entertainment and media. From creating my own magazines, to organizing events for my schools. Entertainment and m


3. Do you think women receive enough credit for their contributions to music?

I think women receive more credit in the aspect of being the musician/artist; but I do not think the women in media/music that work behind the scenes get enough credit!


4. Do you think the #MeToo movement will help improve things for women in music?

I think it will, I think it will impact many industries and allow women's voices to not only be heard but to also be perceived ad creditable. 

5. What needs to be done to improve the communication between older and younger women?

I think the most important aspect to improve on is the generational gap. I believe that idea of separation makes us believe that older/younger women cannot communicate or understand one another. As women, no matter the age, we can and should all be able to relate to and encourage one another, no matter the differences.

6. Who is your model for entertainment and why?

Karen Civil, Miss Diddy and Scottie Beam are my top 3 entertainment industry influences. They are all very powerful women in the industry who have mastered their purposes.


7. Where do see the role of women in entertainment growing?

Ideally, I see the woman taking the forefront of the entertainment industry. Not only as far as the content that we see and hear, but also behind the scenes and developing the next era of entertainment. You can look at so many women writers, actresses and business women prevail in this last decade within the entertainment industry.


 

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Tati Mia - DJ

@imgoodtho

1.First concert you attended?

Jessica Simpson lol

2. What made you want to be in entertainment?

My Mom and Grandma put me in theater camp and ballet when i was little and i always just loved music and dancing


3. Do you think women receive enough credit for their contributions to music?

Not really i feel like we do have our greats that we honor but out of the tons of talent media only puts a few on a pedestal.


4. Do you think the #MeToo movement will help improve things for women in music?

Honestly people that do things like that don’t have empathy and I don’t think it will change anything it def puts light on these situations but its been this way for so long where women are brain washed to think we have to submit or do sexual things to get ahead that there are still women that will be victims of sexual assault sadly but at least more women are speaking out


5. Who is your model for entertainment ?

I’m inspired but many, I always looked up to J.lo because I’m Hispanic and I love MJ and Tupac and artist that dress like Tom Boys such as eve Gwen Stefani , Left eye, Pink and Avril Lavigne.


6. Where do see the role of women in entertainment growing?

I’m happy to see more media agencies run by women and even seeing artist having female managers is good start